Stone Series Publishing

The Official Site

Every stone tells a story, and I’ve tripped over and kicked many stones . . .


When I was a child, my mind was always spinning and weaving these fantastic tales. That wasn’t necessarily a good thing. Needless to say, I’ve never scored an ‘A’ in listening skills. My tuning out was a result of ’creative overload‘. There was nothing more satisfying that being able to ‘leave’ the classroom, getting caught in my own web of fantasy. I was happiest there: lost in that place that only existed inside of my mind.


Fast forward to the last decade or so, during my legal career, when I had begun to question my decisions and asking myself, “What do I really want?” At that time, I was working for a small firm and was licensed as a Private Investigator. My job was surveillance: investigating everything from domestic concerns to insurance fraud cases. My career as a P.I. was as exciting as it was tedious, and that road led me to open my own firm where I worked as a Paralegal, focusing my scope of service on Provincial matters.



Nevertheless, just as I had done in the classroom, I found myself daydreaming in the courtroom, staring blankly at the pews, working out scenes in my mind for the screenplays that I had been working on.


The first of my screenplays to be transformed into a book was The Golden Key; a transitional picture book series. Read the article link below.


www.torontosun.com/2011/12/07/a-very-sweet-read


“Let your life speak.” And my life spoke. When my screenplay unfolded into a children’s book, full of watercolor images that my sister, Sanja, had traditionally painted, something profound clicked for me. To be able to see my characters come to life, not on the big screen but on paper, was pretty spectacular. That defining moment changed the way that I viewed my life. I was at peace. Along with writing poetry, which was both gratifying and curative, I’d written several screenplays which I had tucked away. I shuffled through my stacks of scripts, considering which one to transform into a manuscript next. I chose to convert Angels in Stone, which was released in 2012.


The screenplay version of Angels in Stone was then very much the same, although key elements were left out. This is one of the downsides where scriptwriting is con¬cerned. A writer must convey the story in a certain amount of pages, keeping in mind that the story is told through dialogue and scene setting, (what the camera sees). In a script, the writer has to transmit the emotions through action, leaving out the vital and most 

intricate details that one would otherwise read between the lines, such as the character’s thoughts, back-story, and so on. This is where turning my script into a book became my most liberating and rewarding experience as a writer. 


The manuscript was my stage. I was both actor and director. I was able to get inside of my characters, get under their skin, and feel their every emotion pertaining to each situation.


Another plus to writing a book was being able to spin fiction from non-fiction, going deeper than the script, adding the layers that ultimately build an ark. Character development. Although my main characters are all wholly fictitious, certain historic facts remain true. I have always had a deep appreciation for historical events, and when writing Angels in Stone, as well as the books that followed; my knowledge became useful. Readers want to believe the fantasy; and if an author succeeds, by interlacing true facts into his story, creating the realm of probability, it makes for a more realistic read.


Readers want that. They want to fall into the worlds that writers create. Readers want to believe that somewhere in the universe lie the answers to our greatest questions; that hidden behind the billowy clouds are those legendary castles in the sky; and that angels, dressed in pauper’s clothes, walk among us; and that the Golden Lab that woke his owners up when the family Christmas tree caught fire, was really a celestial creature.

This is my intention as a writer: to have you, the reader, immerse yourself . . . and believe.